From Robot Companions to Robot Rights to Smart Farming – 10th Annual Conference to Canvass Emerging Law and Policy

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CORAL GABLES, Fla. (September 20, 2021) – Machine learning, artificial intelligence, and robotic systems are changing our society, our laws, and our social constructs at breakneck speed. We Robot, the annual, interdisciplinary virtual conference on the emerging legal and policy questions relating to robots and the AIs that often control them, returns to the University of Miami School of Law, the founding institution, September 23-25, 2021.

Media is welcome to register using the WeRobotmedia code. Information media may find helpful: history of the conference, article on the inaugural conference and the Miami Law founder Michael Froomkin, papers, conference organizers, Miami as an emerging tech hub, and conference program and links to presenter profiles. Also go to https://miami.box.com/s/8sdzfb6oc2g1sk28xou7d4fc2b715xxd for previous conference and founder clips, logos, headshots, and zip files to all the conference papers.

The conference unites those on the front lines of robot design, development, and deployment with legal policymakers and influencers, and even philosophers, in the legal and social structures in the robotic sphere.

Conference topics keep a finger on the pulse of robot law

Marking the 10th anniversary of the conference, We Robot 2021 will present scholarly papers, technological demonstrations, and poster session presentations by North American and international academics, practitioners, and others from diverse fields. The unique conference fosters interdisciplinary collaborations between developers of robotics, artificial intelligence, and related technology and experts in the humanities, social science, and law and policy.

Sample themes and topics of this year’s three-day virtual program include:

Robots and health care

“Diverse Patient Perspectives on the Role of AI and Big Data in health care”

“Somebody That I Used to Know: The Risks of Personalizing Robots for Dementia Care”

“Reported Ethical Concerns Over Use of Robots for COVID-19 and Recommendations for Responsible Innovation for Future Pandemics”

Autonomous vehicles

“Driving Into the Loop: Mapping Automation Bias & Liability Issues for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems”

“Autonomous Vehicles as Public Infrastructure: Building an ‘AV Development Index’ for Tomorrow’s Cities”

Robot rights and laws

“Debunking Robot Rights: Metaphysically, Ethically and Legally”

“Examining Correlations between Human Empathy and Vicbots”

“Creating Legal Rules for Robots”

“Artificial Intelligence: The Challenges For Criminal Law In Facing The Passage From Technological Automation To Artificial Autonomy”

Robots and the environment

“Smart Farming versus Traditional Knowledge”

“Robots in the Ocean”

Robots and society

“Social Robots and Children’s Fundamental Rights”

“On the Practicalities of Robots in Public Spaces”

Seminal conference and its goals, more relevant than ever

The conference builds on a growing body of scholarship, much of it shaped by earlier editions, which explores how the increasing sophistication and autonomous decision-making capabilities of robots and their widespread deployment disrupt existing legal regimes or require rethinking policy issues.

“Robots are moving out of the warehouse and into our lives,” said A. Michael Froomkin, the Laurie Silvers and Mitchell Rubenstein Distinguished Professor of Law and a co-founder of the conference. “We are just seeing the start of a boom in everything from delivery robots to medical robots, to autonomous military drones deployed in combat.”

With AI and robotics growing so fast and little time to consider their legal, ethical, and moral uses, attendees consider the issues raised by robots and their benefits in the home, hospitals, business, public spaces, military settings, and beyond.

The purpose of this conference is to continue to frame and report on research agendas relating to the deployment of robots in society, to inform policymakers of the issues, and to help legal design rules that will maximize opportunities and minimize risks arising from the increased deployment of robots in society.

Froomkin echoes the conference’s relevance, “Everywhere a robot goes, it creates legal and policy issues that need to be worked out to make the world safe for both robots and especially people.”

Previously, the conference has been held at Stanford University, the University of Miami, the University of Ottawa, the University of Washington, and Yale University.

The conference will be held virtually; see daily schedule here. Registration is open. For more information, visit https://werobot2021.com/.

 

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The University of Miami’s mission is to educate and nurture students, to create knowledge, and to provide service to our community and beyond. Committed to excellence and proud of the diversity of our University family, we strive to develop future leaders of our nation and the world. www.miami.edu

 

The University of Miami School of Law’s mission is to foster the intellectual discipline, creativity, and critical skills that will prepare its graduates for the highest standards of professional competence in the practice of law in a global environment subject to continual ― and not always predictable ― transformation; to cultivate a broad range of legal and interdisciplinary scholarship that, working at the cutting edge of its field, enhances the development of law and legal doctrine, and deepens society’s understanding of law and its role in society; and to fulfill the legal profession’s historic duty to promote the interests of justice. www.law.miami.edu