LL.M. in International Law: General or Inter-American Specialization

Inter-American Law2 Choices of Specializations

1) LL.M. in International Law (General)
2) LL.M. in International Law (Inter-American Law)

Who Should Consider this Degree? With Which Specialization?

The LL.M. in International Law(General)
-ideally for American law graduates looking to deepen their knowledge of International Law.
The LL.M. in International Law (Inter-American Law):
-for U.S. law graduates and foreign law graduates who wish to specialize in Latin American practice;
-for experienced attorneys who are practicing, or intend to practice, in or with Latin America and are looking to deepen their expertise;
-for current Miami Law students looking to focus on this field with a joint degree.

Full-time, Part-time Study
Students may study either specialization on a full-time or part-time basis. For part-time study, the same minimum number of credits is required for the LL.M. degree and must be earned within two years from the initial date of matriculation.


1) LL.M. in International Law (General)

Today’s legal practice and legal institutions are unavoidably multinational as the world has become more global and countries more interconnected. Legal rules that previously affected domestic matters are now often subject to the laws of numerous jurisdictions, which is why the understanding International Law has become more and more necessary.This specialization provides students with the background necessary to recognize, understand and manage problems arising in the international legal order, including:

International Trade
Investment
Business
Environmental Problems
Protection of Human Rights.

As a global hub, Miami and The University of Miami School of Law is an ideal place to studyInternational Law. Studying in Miami, students in the program are exposed to a broad background in public international law (both traditional public law and international economic law), comparative law, and international business transactions.

Courses & Requirements

Students must complete 24 credits with a minimum grade point average of 2.30/4.00 and comply with the LL.M. writing requirement in order to receive the Masters of Law in International Law degree. Many students pursue different paths in reachingthis goal. The exact number of courses taken depends on how many credits are associated with each course. Many students are most interested in our varied international and comparative law courses.

 Required Courses

International Business Transactions: This course focuses on the problems likely to be encountered when firms engage in transnational business transactions, both inbound and outbound. Emphasis is placed on finding practical solutions to such problems in light of current events, and upon the interplay between the current law of the United States and that of the civil law countries.The areas covered include: (i) sales and financing of goods and services, (ii) establishing and managing agencies, distributorships and other strategic alliances in transnational markets, (iii) protecting and licensing intellectual property rights, (iv) conducting direct foreign investments, including the protection of property from expropriation and nationalization, (v) complying with local laws including foreign exchange regulations, competition policies, laws aimed at protecting the nationals of the foreign country, and labor and environmental laws. The course will also touch upon problems involved in transnational litigation, including access to foreign courts, service of documents and discovery of evidence located abroad, the recognition of foreign judgments, and international arbitrations.

International Economic Law: This course reviews the basic principles that guide international economic activity, including: investment, trade in goods and services, foreign direct and portfolio investment and transfers of intellectual property. The course will focus on some of the principal multilateral institutions charged with regulating international economic policy: the World Trade Organization (WTO), including both the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), and the agreement on trade related intellectual property, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), regional trade agreements such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), MERCOSUR and the European Union and organizations such as the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and the United Nations Commission on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). Finally, the course will examine some of the ramifications of the globalization of the world economy for the environment, developing nations and regulation of multinational enterprises.

International Law: This course examines the law that governs the activities ofnations. Included are such topics as what international law is and how it contrasts with domestic law, how international law is created, who is governed by and has rights under international law, how international disputes are resolved, and the role of the United Nations. The course is important for those wanting to understand the international legal system and global change, but also provides a useful foundation for many other courses, such as International Copyright, International Criminal Law, International Economic Law, International Environmental Law, International Human Rights Law, International Tax, and related seminars.Writing Requirement: Seminar or independent research paper approved by Faculty Chair.

 Elective Courses

Accountig for Lawyers:  The course focuses on the analysis and use of financial accounting information in the evaluation of corporate performance. The course initially demonstrates the accounting process and resulting generation of financial statements. Building on these core accounting concepts, the course emphasizes the understanding of financial statements prepared under U.S. and International Accounting Standards and the analysis of these financial statements including common size analysis, ratio analysis, the impact of taxes, and credit analysis. Completion of the course will enhance the student's ability to read, interpret and analyze financial statements for making investment, credit, acquisition and other evaluation decisions. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Upon completion of this course you should be able to: Comprehend financial accounting's role in business and understand the differences between financial and management accounting. Read and understand company financial statements including the income statement, the balance sheet, the statement of changes in shareholders equity and the statement of cash flows. Use common size analysis and ratio analysis to evaluate a company on the following dimensions: Efficiency, Liquidity, Solvency, Profitability, Cash flow. Understand how creditors and investors evaluate a company, including an assessment of credit and investment worthiness.

Administrative Law:  Most laws that Congress passes require implementation. For a very wide variety of areas the instrument of that implementation is a federal agency. As a result, in the United States a multitude of governmental agencies exercise authority over the economy, and over the lives of every American. These agencies have the power to make legally binding rules (aka "regulations" or "red tape"), to issue valuable permits and licenses, to levy fines, and to adjudicate. Indeed, one agency, the Social Security Administration, decides more cases every year than all the state and federal courts combined. This is a course about laws and rules that bind federal agencies, and thus about the extent to which federal agencies can make rules and decisions that bind us. It surveys the means by which people (and their lawyers) can challenge or influence administrative exercises of authority in the face of often broad or ambiguous delegations of authority from Congress and in particular how and when agency decisions are subject to judicial review. Always lurking is the question of how we reconcile our dependence on an unelected, expert bureaucracy with our commitments to a government that is democratically accountable and legitimate. Administrative Law is vitally important for anyone contemplating a practice that might involve federal regulations in any way. It is particularly valuable for students who are considering a practice involving highly regulated areas such as: Communications, Disability, Energy, Environment, Family and Child Services, Financial Markets, Immigration, Labor, Housing, or Land Use, but it is also relevant to almost every other area of practice. 

Admirality:  A study of legal issues arising in the maritime and recreational boating industry, including admiralty jurisdiction, maritime liens, salvage, cargo, carriage of goods by sea, charter parties, general average, the rights of seamen and maritime workers, collision and limitation of liability.

Alcohol Beverage Law:  Survey of beverage alcohol and governance of all 3 tiers of the beverage alcohol industry in conjunction with various state and federal alcoholic beverage statutory schemes, promulgated rules and decisional case law.

Antitrust:  Antitrust is concerned with how firms compete in the marketplace. Our antitrust laws are incredibly broad in scope. They apply across a huge swath of the economy—antitrust cases have involved everything from Silicon Valley tech giants to local retailers, from the legal profession to amateur sports, hospitals, and much, much more. Through this broad lens, the study of antitrust allows us to better understand how modern political economies function and why businesses (large and small) behave the way they do.

Arbitration

Art Law:  
This course examines the intersection of law and the visual arts within the U.S. legal system. Topics include such issues as artists' rights; the art market, with an emphasis on authenticity and good title; the international movement of art and antiquities; the fate of art in times of armed conflict; and legal issues applicable to art museums. The course readings comprise chapters from the manuscript of Merryman, Urice, & Frankel, Law, Ethics, & The Visual Arts (6th ed., Cambridge University Press, 2021) and include cases, articles, international treaties, statutes, and other materials. 

Aviation Law:  International treaties and domestic laws govern every action taken inside an airport and outside in the national and international air space. This course examines the laws and policies that apply from the moment a passenger sets foot into an airport ranging from cyber security threats to the airline industry, to the criminalization of acts on board an aircraft, to domestic and international laws governing personal injuries occurring during flight, including a catastrophic air crash.

Banking Law:  The course serves as an introduction to the law governing Federal regulation of banks and their banking and nonbanking affiliates. The course will cover the basic statutes governing the chartering of national banks, the Federal Reserve system, deposit insurance, and depository institution holding companies, as well as the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 and related capital, liquidity and "prudential" regulation. Emphasis is placed on the rules governing the activities permissible for different kinds of depository institutions, and companies affiliated with depository institutions, prudential regulations to protect the safety and soundness of institutions, and capital requirements imposed on institutions by Federal law and by the Basel Committee on Bank Supervision. Special emphasis will be placed on issues arising from the current "Covid-19" crisis, and the responses of Congress and of the Federal Reserve System to the crisis, including the various lending or asset acquisition "facilities" established by the Federal Reserve system.

Business Law

Children and the Law:  
This class will address legal advocacy on behalf of children, while providing students with a strong foundation in lawyering skills and professional values. The substantive areas that will be discussed will include dependency, guardianship, mental health, medical decision-making, child support, emancipation, and family violence. Special emphasis will be placed on dependency law, including abuse, abandonment and neglect, foster care, termination of parental rights, adoption, children's right to services and protection from harm, and state liability for harm. In addition, the class will examine the role of the child's attorney and ethical considerations in the representation of children. Constitutional, statutory, and common laws impacting children will be addressed, including the legal interests of parents and the government and the law involving children's rights. Guest speakers will include experts and leading practitioners in the field of advocacy.

Civil Procedure  

Coastal Law:  
Three-quarters of the United States population is concentrated on the coastal margin where people meet the sea. Along the shorelines of thirty coastal and Great Lakes states is a preponderance of this Nation´s industrial investment: manufacturing, refining, hydropower generation, ship-building, offshore oil and gas development, offshore wind, and fisheries. These same shorelines which house the population and its industry, also provide sources of beauty, recreation, and food and safety for their inhabitants. Estuaries serve as the nursery grounds for coastal fisheries. Shellfish flourish throughout their full life cycle in tidal waters. Shorebirds stop to feed on tidal flats. Development competes with the preservation of the natural beauty of the shoreline. The human and industrial pressures, as well as climate change, threaten and/or destroy ecological balances. This course examines the competing interests in the coastal zone, the problems of public and private ownership rights, State and Federal issues, and the conflicts of legal jurisdiction. Shifts in federal policy, as well as varying policy considerations, are explored in depth. Specific state and federal statutes along with environmental concerns are integrated with the policy questions.

Commerical Law 

Constitutional Law 

Construction Law:  This course is an intensive study of the various aspects of construction law, including construction contracting, claims and litigation. The course considers the rights and duties of developers, contractors, subcontractors, design professionals, bonding companies and lenders. It emphasizes pitfalls to avoid in construction contracting, the bidding process, government work, construction scheduling and delays, warranties, arbitration or litigation, damages, remedies, waivers and defenses.

Contracts  

Copyright:  
This course will address the legal protection provided under the Copyright Act of 1976 (and subsequent amendments) for artistic, musical and literary works, and software. Topics will include copyrightability (what kinds of works are protected by copyright and what kinds are excluded); ownership and disposition of copyrights; infringement of the various rights in the copyright bundle (rights, inter alia, of reproduction, adaptation, public performance, public display); and fair use. Among other things, the course will attend to the application of copyright principles in the online environment. We will concern ourselves primarily with U.S. copyright law.

Criminal Law 

Election Law:  
This course provides an overview of the legal regulation of elections and politics with an emphasis on current controversies. The course will cover apportionment; gerrymandering; primaries; the Voting Rights Act (provisions on racial equality and protection of minority language voters); election administration issues including voter identification, voting technology, election security, and auditing election results; ballot access including third parties and independent candidates; campaign finance; and ballot initiatives. The readings and discussion will address both theoretical and practical questions about how well the interests of voters are protected by current structures.

Employment Law:  This class provides a survey of the law governing the employment relationship. On completion of this course, students will have acquired understanding of the basic sources of regulation of the employment relationship and the competing legal models for regulating the workplace. Students will also develop a deeper knowledge of the particular legal rules governing employee job security, mobility, privacy and voice, and the terms and conditions of employment. On completion of this course, students will also have developed skills in interpreting statutory and judicial texts and applying them to new factual contexts. The primary emphasis is the legal rights of the individual employee. The materials will also offer an introduction to the right to collective job security under the National Labor Relations Act, and to the basic claims and defenses available under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, but are not intended to provide comprehensive coverage of those areas of the law. Students interested in anti-discrimination law are encouraged to take Employment Discrimination Law. Students interested in unionized workplaces are encouraged to take Labor Law.

Energy Law:  This course offers an introduction to energy law, regulation, and policy. Beginning with the common law roots of public utility law and the economic principles of energy regulation, the course will explore the electricity sector’s market structure and competitive design features. The legal framework and policy challenges for power generation from a wide range of energy sources will be discussed, from nuclear to natural gas to renewables. Throughout, the course will invite strategic thinking and advocacy from a variety of angles to understand and reconcile the competing interests that shape energy law and policy today.


Entertainment, Arts and Sports


Evidence:  This course provides a comprehensive overview of the law governing proof and fact-finding in federal civil and criminal trials. It covers the rationales and assumptions underlying the Federal Rules of Evidence as well as the purpose animating the Sixth Amendment's Confrontation Clause. By the end of the course, you should be able to (i) recognize evidentiary issues; (ii) interpret the Federal Rules of Evidence and apply them to new factual scenarios; (iii) understand the constitutional limitations on the admissibility of evidence; and (iv) assess the effectiveness and policy consequences of those limitations. 


Family Law:  This class will cover the state’s regulation of family life and resolution of private arrangements or disputes among family members including entry into marriage, legal treatment of cohabitants and same sex couples, divorce, alimony, custody, visitation, child support and adoption. The course serves as an introduction for students considering family law practice, a national overview for those generally interested in family law issues, and will cover Florida law on commonly tested topics for those taking the Florida bar.


Finance Law


Gaming Law:  This course will examine the legal issues associated with the ownership, regulation and operation of wagering and gaming facilities in the United States. Specific areas to be covered include: (i) state regulation of casinos, racinos and card rooms, (ii) state lotteries and video lottery terminal operations, (iii) tribal gaming under the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, (iv) racing and pari-mutuel wagering, (v) internet wagering and gaming and (vi) high-speed fantasy sports. 


Hospitality Law:  The class will provide the students with a practical understanding of the hotel asset-- a combination of real property, personal property and an operating business. The class will analyze actual agreements and case studies to learn about current acquisition, financing, joint venture, and management and franchise issues and how these issues are resolved in today's world. A portion of the class will be spent analyzing the current litigation trends between hotel operators and owners.

Human Rights

Immigration:  
This course offers an introduction to immigration law, procedure and policy. Topics covered include the foundation of immigration power, roles of different federal agencies, statutes governing admission and deportation, types of immigration status, asylum and refugee protection, judicial review, and citizenship.

Intellectual Property:  This course will analyze agreements with material intellectual property rights components, including patent, trademark, copyright, and trade secret license agreements; distribution agreements; and supply agreements. The course will introduce students to different types of intellectual property provisions—including warranties, indemnifications, and license grantbacks—and different methods of drafting, analyzing, and negotiating agreements. Students will develop an understanding of how these provisions can provide companies with the freedom-of-action that they need to successfully operate their businesses. 

International Law:  This course provides students with an understanding of the development and application of the law governing the international community, its basic principles, doctrines, methodologies, institutions and processes. Students will acquire an understanding of how international law relates to contemporary transnational relations and politics as well as its significance in the domestic legal order. Topical areas covered in this course include the creation and status of international law, its sources and actors, the law governing the use of force, international rules relating to jurisdiction, human rights, humanitarian law and international conflict resolution. Where appropriate this course will include recent developments and their impact on systemic questions in the field. This course provides a strong grounding for more specialized courses such as International Economic Law, Law of the Sea, Human Rights Law, the Human Rights Clinic, International Criminal Law, International Environmental Law as well as related seminars.

Islamic Law

Labor Law:  
Labor law structures the process through which workers organize and engage collectively, rather than individually, with their employers. This course will cover the basics of private sector labor law in the United States. We will study the National Labor Relations Act and the processes of union organizing and collective bargaining that the NLRA establishes. We will also consider historical perspectives on labor law, issues particular to public sector unions, union participation in the political process, the “right to work,” and the ability of non-unionized workers to engage in concerted action. Finally, through the lens of labor law, the course will tackle issues of statutory interpretation, administrative law, and constitutional law. 

Maritime Law:  This course is a systematic and comparative examination of the general maritime law, the body of customary legal doctrine which has long governed maritime navigation and commerce, in some cases for centuries. While this body of law developed mostly independently of any particular legal system, it has found consistent expression within the domestic law of countries around the world, as well as in international conventions and other instruments.

Media Law

Mediation:  
This seminar examines mediation theory and practice from the perspective of the Florida mediator. A variety of simulations, exercises and role-plays will be employed, along with readings, to encourage a critical assessment of mediation concepts and practices. Mediation skills will be taught and practiced. Topics to be covered include history of mediation, ethical issues in mediation, how to remain neutral, bringing parties to agreement, dealing with power imbalances and the lawyer's role in the mediation process. 

Mergers and Acquisitions:  This course takes a transactional approach to the principal business and legal issues in mergers and acquisitions of corporate (and other) business enterprises. At least for the acquired business the M&A transaction is likely to be the most important in its business life. The transactions are complex, requiring careful documentation, and frequently involve: (i) special duties of directors, (ii) difficult issues of drafting the complex documents inevitably involved in such transactions, (iii) significant securities law issues when public corporations are involved, and, (iv) if hostile, may involve take-over defenses. Although M&A transaction may also involve the rights of holders of other corporate securities in addition to those of the common shareholders, those issues are principally covered by the course in Corporate Finance. Although tax issues rarely drive mergers and acquisitions, tax issues may be important, particularly in an acquisition involving a closely-held business. Similar issues for unincorporated businesses will be considered, where appropriate. A major focus will be examining an M&A Agreement in an Appendix to the casebook as well as ABA Model Stock and Asset Purchase Agreements and other acquisition agreements.

Mortgage Law:  This course examines significant property and mortgage law issues, including the use of mortgage substitutes, installment land contracts, rights and duties of parties prior to foreclosure, transfer of the mortgagor’s and the mortgagee’s interests and theories of title. Other topics include acceleration and marshaling, judicial foreclosure, including the necessary, proper-party distinction, power of sale foreclosure, statutory redemption and deficiency judgment issues.

Music Law:  During this short course, you will be representing a hypothetical four member band of which two of the members are the primary songwriters starting with your initial client interview with the band and the terms of your representation agreement. You will explore the material issues to be addressed in the band partnership agreement (including ownership of the group name and the group’s songs), material terms of recording agreements and music publishing agreements, analyze the various sources of income available to the songwriter/recording artist and discuss how each of those income streams is determined. Industry customary forms of music publishing, recording, band partnership, tour & personal appearance engagement, sponsorship/endorsement and merchandise contracts will be distributed as part of the course materials and the drafting and negotiation of key terms those contracts will be discussed.

National Security Law:  This course evaluates how law (both domestic and international law) influences United States national security programs, policies, and operations (both domestic and international). Issues arising in connection with fulfilling the government's national security obligations include both (a) doctrinal content of domestic United States law (constitutional and statutory law) and international law (customary and treaty law); and (b) how these doctrines are applied or implemented in practice.

Professional Responsibility:  This course introduces students to the ethical requirements of the practice of law in The United States based on the American Bar Association's Model Rules of Professional Conduct. Utilizing a problem-oriented casebook, the course covers the responsibilities of lawyers and their relationships with clients, the legal profession, the courts, and the public. Particular emphasis is placed on the lawyer's fiduciary duties of client control, communication, competence, confidentiality, and conflict of interest resolution.

Robot Law:  'Artificial Intelligence' (AI) includes a variety of technologies, notably 'machine learning' systems such as IBM's Watson, which won a 'Jeopardy' match, Google's Ultra Go, which trounced a Go Master, and a plethora of systems designed to predict tumors, shopping habits, and even criminality. 'Robots' increasingly feature varying degrees of autonomy, including systems like self-driving cars, military drones, and robo-surgeons. Behind many robots lies an embodied or even remotely connected AI, making the two new technologies intertwined.

Sports Law:  This course will survey the major areas of sports law with a focus on the laws governing professional and collegiate leagues, teams and athletes. The areas of sports law to be studied include antitrust, labor (collective bargaining and arbitration), trademark and copyright, rights of publicity and privacy, and anti-discrimination law. The laws that protect athletes from discrimination that will be highlighted are the U.S. Constitution (Equal Protection), Title VI and IX of the Civil Rights Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The history and underlying economics of professional and amateur sports will be introduced as necessary to aid in understanding the material.

Torture and the Law:  This writing seminar provides students with the opportunity to do research and writing in the areas of American Constitutional law, Comparative Criminal Law and International Criminal Law. In 2004, revelations that the American government had approved the use of "enhanced interrogation techniques" as a tool in its conduct of the War on Terror triggered a series of responses -- governmental and non-governmental, domestic and international. Drawing on a range of materials, including Congressional hearings, U.S. Supreme Court cases, Office of Legal Counsel opinions, key decisions of the International Court of Justice (ICJ), the International Criminal Court (ICC), the ad hoc tribunals for the Former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, International Human Rights Investigations and Reports, as well as documentary films, the seminar will provide the raw materials with which to explore the implications of the torture scandal for the future of American Constitutional government and a world order of human dignity in light of the original intent of this country's Founders. Students interested in pursuing careers in criminal law, international criminal law, international relations, human rights and national security will find the course a useful vehicle for developing an integrated understanding of the way these fields interconnect.

Trademark Law:  This course will provide an introduction to the legal protection under US law for trademarks, service marks and trade dress. Much of the course will concentrate on the key federal statute in this field, the Lanham Act (15 USC 1051 et seq), but it will also cover related state and common law doctrines and, to a limited extent, the relevant international agreements. The course will also consider conflicts between trademark law and the First Amendment, as well as contrasts between trademark law and other forms of intellectual property protection, such as copyright law, patent law and the right of publicity.

Trusts and Estates:  The course will cover basic topics in the area of estates and trusts including, but not limited to, the following: theories of property transmission at death, intestacy, testamentary capacity, will formalities, nonprobate transfers, construction of wills, restrictions on the power of disposition, creation and characteristics of trusts, powers of appointment and future interests. The course will focus heavily on the Uniform Probate Code, although statutory examples will also be drawn from a range of U.S. jurisdictions. The course will not cover estate tax issues.
 

Joint J.D./LL.M.

The Joint J.D./LL.M. in International Law (General) offers the opportunity to earn both degrees at once, saving both time and tuition expense.

For Current J.D. Students - Timing and Application Requirements for Admission to the LL.M. Program: Joint J.D./LL.M. students must earn a combined 100 credits (instead of 112 normally required for a J.D. [88 credits] and LL.M. [24 credits] degree) with a grade point average of 2.3 out of 4.0 to earn both degrees.

When to Apply

Miami Law J.D. students may apply to the LL.M. Program in during fall or spring of their 2L year, but before the end of the spring semester of the second year.

Begin Taking LL.M. Courses

2nd
OR
3rd year

Shortest Completion Time

6 semesters +1 summer

J.D. Credits Required

76

LL.M. Credits Required

24

Number of Credits Saved

12

 

For International LL.M. Students - Timing and Application Requirements for Admission to the J.D. Program: Current International Law LL.M. students should submit an application for admission to the J.D. program during the Fall semester of their LL.M. studies and no later than November 1. It is recommended that students discuss their intention to apply early to the J.D. program with their LL.M. program director early on in their LL.M. studies to make sure their course selection enables them to complete all graduation requirements effectively. Please refer to the J.D. application overview page for further information.A separate admissions committee will review their application and determine eligibility to enter the J.D. program. The admissions committee takes into consideration the nature of, and grade point average in, classes taken by the applicant while enrolled in the LL.M. program.

Miami Law may award up to 29 Advanced Standing Credits towards the J.D. to students for their foreign law studies. The specific number of such credits will be determined at the time of admission to the J.D. based on a review of the applicant’s J.D. application file. When a student enrolls in the Joint J.D./LL.M., then he or she needs only 100 credits (instead of 112) to earn both degrees. If a student receives 29 Advanced Standing Credits towards the J.D., this means that only a total of 71 credits are needed to complete the Joint J.D./LL.M. In most cases, full time students can complete their remaining credits in three semesters after their LL.M. year.


2) LL.M. in International Law (Inter-American)

This degree provides the knowledge and skills needed to represent clients investing or doing business in Latin America and the Caribbean.The program develops specialized knowledge of common law, civil law, and international law. It also offers wide exposure to industries represented throughout the region, such as banking, real estate, hospitality, telecommunications, technology, transportation, energy, entertainment, aviation, retail and insurance.

Why Miami for Inter-American Law?

Location: Miami is the gateway to Latin America. Not only do many American, European, and Asian companies have their Latin American regional headquarters here, but also the culture of the city lends itself to the learning and practicing of this niche legal area.

Work/Network with Local Latin-American Industry Experts: Students are paired with a legal in-house mentor that matches the student’s top of interest for the capstone project in the “Doing Business in Latin America Workshop” course. The student meets and consults with the Mentor periodically throughout the semester for insight on the topic. 

Bar Exam: Foreign-trained graduates of the Inter-American LL.M. Program may sit for the Bar Exam in several states without a J.D. degree, the most common being New York and California.  After being admitted to any bar in the United States, graduates may practice federal law in any of the 50 states or serve as corporate counsel within a corporation anywhere in the United States. 

The Americas Curriculum – “Path to Practice”

The program requires a total of 24 credits completed with a grade point average of 2.3/4.00, of which a minimum of 12 credits must be Inter-American law courses. Many students pursue different paths in reaching this goal as the exact number of courses taken depends on how many credits are associated with each course. 

Practicum in Latin America: Miami Law coordinates with major regional law firms to provide students with the opportunity to participate in a summer practicum in a Latin American country

Courses in Spanish: The law school offers an array of courses that are taught each semester in Spanish, enabling students a unique opportunity to develop their technical language skills as they master contemporary legal concepts. These courses are generally for American law graduates who are bilingual and will benefit from the practical use of the language in a legal setting. 

 Courses: Required and Elective

REQUIRED COURSES

Doing Business in Latin America
Doing Business in Latin America Workshop
International Business Transactions
International Law

An Introduction to U.S. Law *
Legal Communication and Research*

(*Required only for foreign-trained law graduates to provide a foundation in American common law doctrine as well as legal writing and research.)

ELECTIVE COURSES

Students may then choose 7 additional credits from Inter-American law courses. Recently offered electives include:

  • Dispute Resolution in Latin America (in Spanish)
  • Latin American Contracts (in Spanish)
  • International Investments and Negotiations
  • International Trade Law
  • Introduction to Caribbean Law
  • Latin America: Lawyering Across Borders

Joint J.D./LL.M.

The Joint J.D./LL.M. in International Law (Inter-American Law) offers the opportunity to earn both degrees at once, saving both time and tuition expense.

For Current J.D. Students - Timing and Application Requirements for Admission to the LL.M. Program: Joint J.D./LL.M. students must earn a combined 100 credits (instead of 112 normally required for a J.D. [88 credits] and LL.M. [24 credits] degree) with a grade point average of 2.3 out of 4.0 to earn both degrees.

When to Apply

Miami Law J.D. students may apply to the LL.M. Program in during fall or spring of their 2L year, but before the end of the spring semester of the second year.

Begin Taking LL.M. Courses

2nd
OR
3rd year

Shortest Completion Time

6 semesters +1 summer

J.D. Credits Required

76

LL.M. Credits Required

24

Number of Credits Saved

12

 

For International LL.M. Students - Timing and Application Requirements for Admission to the J.D. Program: Current International Law LL.M. students should submit an application for admission to the J.D. program during the Fall semester of their LL.M. studies and no later than November 1. It is recommended that students discuss their intention to apply early to the J.D. program with their LL.M. program director early on in their LL.M. studies to make sure their course selection enables them to complete all graduation requirements effectively. Please refer to the J.D. application overview page for further information.A separate admissions committee will review their application and determine eligibility to enter the J.D. program. The admissions committee takes into consideration the nature of, and grade point average in, classes taken by the applicant while enrolled in the LL.M. program.

Miami Law may award up to 29 Advanced Standing Credits towards the J.D. to students for their foreign law studies. The specific number of such credits will be determined at the time of admission to the J.D. based on a review of the applicant’s J.D. application file. When a student enrolls in the Joint J.D./LL.M., then he or she needs only 100 credits (instead of 112) to earn both degrees. If a student receives 29 Advanced Standing Credits towards the J.D., this means that only a total of 71 credits are needed to complete the Joint J.D./LL.M. In most cases, full time students can complete their remaining credits in three semesters after their LL.M. year.


Program Leadership  

Carmen Perez-Llorca, Director, International Graduate Law Programs & Lecturer in Law

Caroline Bradley, Faculty Chair, International Law (General) & Professor of Law

 

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