Restoration

•   Introduction
•   News          
     Major Players       

•  
Reports
•  
Water Conservation Areas
•  
Sustainability
•  
Restudy

   
Related documents
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Introduction  

The initial shift from large-scale litigation to restoration efforts began within the framework outlined in the Settlement Agreement entered as a consent decree 847 F. Supp. 1567, in United States v SFWMD, No. 88-1886 (S.D. Fla.) in 1992, and through the passage of the Everglades Forever Act (373.4592 F.S.) the result of settlement of the state SWIM actions, DOAH 92-3038 in 1994.     

Settlement Agreement in United States v. SFWMD    

The Settlement Agreement was signed by the federal and state parties effectively resolving a   costly and bitter litigation over ecosystem degradation in the Everglades.  As part of the settlement the signatories agreed to a series of remediation steps that would lead to a reduction of phosphorus and other nutrients entering Everglades National Park and the Loxahatchee Wildlife Refuge adhering to a schedule.  An oversight committee was also established to

Outline of 1991 Settlement Agreement in United States v. South Florida
Water Management District
, No. 88-1886-CIV-HOEVELER:

•   1. Form of the Agreement.
•   2. Commitment on water quality and water quantity.
•   3. Interim and long-term total phosphorus limits.
•   4. Remedial programs.
•   5. Research and monitoring.
•   6. Enforcement contingencies.
•   7. Mutual cooperation.
•   8. Force majeure.


Technical Oversight Committee 

The Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) originated from the Settlement Agreement of July 11, 1991 as a mechanism for technical review and conflict resolution to support the Everglades Program begun by the Agreement and continued in the 1994 Everglades Forever Act (373.4592 F.S.).

The Agreement, entered into by the federal government, the State of Florida, and the South Florida Water Management District establishes interim and long-term total phosphorus concentration limits for the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) and Everglades National Park (Park). The Agreement calls for the construction of Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) to meet the long-term phosphorus limits and for establishment of a regulatory program, with agricultural Best Management Practices as a key component.

In accordance with the Joint Progress Report submitted to the U.S. District Court on October 30, 1995, the Technical Oversight Committee was organized for consensus building and dispute avoidance on technical issues related to Everglades monitoring, phosphorus management and applied research. The TOC meets quarterly to review and recommend applied research, monitoring and compliance conducted pursuant to the terms of the Settlement Agreement and to consider technical advice and assistance from consultants and appropriate state and federal agencies regarding Everglades Program activities. Though the TOC does not bind any party or person as an independent authority, it does provide a public forum to evaluate technical information, particularly as it relates to water quality management and compliance tracking in the Everglades Protection Area. The TOC's overall charge is to serve the needs of the parties to the Settlement Agreement to deliberate and communicate on technical matters.   

from TOC web site     http://www.sfwmd.gov/org/ema/toc/index.html

 

Everglades Forever Act      

The passage of the Everglades Forever Act in 1994 Fla. Stat. ch. 373.4592, removed the underlying cause of action of the state administrative challenges [SWIM actions, DOAH 92-3038] and all related lawsuits were closed by August of 1994 with the exception of the original lawsuit (United States v. South Florida Water Management District, No. 88-1886 (S.D. Fla.)).    

In August 1994, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit affirmed the 1992 Consent Decree and remanded the case to district court for further consideration in light of the Everglades Forever Act (28 F.3d 1563 (11th Cir. 1994), cert denied 115 S.C. 1956)).            

Recent state legislation amending certain deadlines codified in the Everglades Forever Act was passed by the Florida legislature.  Federal district court Judge William Hoeveler was removed from the original water quality case due to public comments he made about the proposed legislative changes.  He was replaced by Hon. Federico Moreno who has named a Special Master to the case.       

See  these special news sections for more information:         

Hon. William Hoeveler           

Hon Federico Moreno            

Special Master                 

 

Major players in the restoration process

 

Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan

web site  http://www.evergladesplan.org           

12-Nov-03      

Programmatic Regulations for the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration
Plan

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers
33 CFR Part 385
RIN 0710-AA49
Programmatic Regulations for the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration
Plan

AGENCY: Army Corps of Engineers, DOD.

ACTION: Final rule.

SUMMARY: The Army promulgates this final rule to establish programmatic regulations for the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. Congress approved the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan in section 601 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2000, which was enacted into law on December 11, 2000. The Act requires the Secretary of the Army to promulgate programmatic regulations to ensure that the goals and purposes of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan are achieved. We have developed this final rule in response to that statutory requirement. The rule establishes processes and procedures that will guide the Army Corps of Engineers in the implementation of the Comprehensive Everglades
Restoration Plan.

Today’s action completes a rule making that began on August 2, 2002 with the publication of proposed regulations. The final rule contain a number of revisions that respond to public comments on the proposed regulations.

DATES: This rule is effective [INSERT DATE 30 DAYS AFTER PUBLICATION IN
THE FEDERAL REGISTER].  December 12, 2003.              

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Stu Appelbaum, Corps of Engineers,
Jacksonville District, at the above address by telephone (904) 232-1877,
or by fax (904) 232-1434. You may also access the programmatic
regulations web page at: http://www.evergladesplan.org/pm/progr_regs.cfm/.

 

Contents Federal Register
Vol. 68, No. 218
Wednesday, November 12, 2003
http://www.access.gpo.gov/su_docs/fedreg/a031112c.html

Engineers Corps
RULES
Everglades; comprehensive restoration plan,
64199–64249 [03–27968]   

I. Background

    Section 601(h)(3) of the Water Resources Development Act of 2000, Public Law 106-541 (114 Stat. 2688) (hereinafter ``WRDA 2000'') requires the Secretary of the Army, after notice and opportunity for public comment, to promulgate regulations to ensure that the goals and
purposes of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (the Plan) are achieved. These final regulations fulfill this requirement and establish the administrative structure for carrying out the Plan.
    The programmatic regulations establish a process: for the development of Project Implementation Reports, Project Cooperation Agreements, and Operating Manuals that will ensure that the goals and the objectives of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) are achieved; to ensure that new information resulting from changes or
unforeseen circumstances, new scientific or technical information or information that is developed through the principles of adaptive management contained in the Plan, and future authorized changes to the Plan will be integrated into the implementation of the Plan; and, to
ensure the protection of the natural system consistent with the goals and purposes of the Plan, including the establishment of interim goals to provide a means by which the restoration success of the Plan will be evaluated throughout the implementation process...       

Read more

text version of rules:          

http://a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/14mar20010800/edocket.access.gpo.gov/2003/03-27968.htm  

 

Legislation     

These are a few of the recent public laws, which provided authorizations specific to the Central and Southern Florida Project and south Florida ecosystem restoration.

web site http://www.evergladesplan.org/facts_info/legislation.cfm         

Water Resources Development Act of 2000

On Dec 11, 2000 the Water Resources Development Act of 2000 (WRDA2000) was signed into law by the President of the United States. (Public Law No. 106-541, of the 106th Congress) Title VI, Section 601, of the Act, describes authorizations specific to the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan.     

http://www.evergladesplan.org/wrda2000/wrda.cfm 

Water Resources Development Act of 1999

Public Law 106-53, Aug 17, 1999
. . . Title I, Sect 101, item 16, of the Act, describes authorizations specific to Hillsboro and Lake Okeechobee Aquifer Storage and Recovery Project . . . Title II, Sect 208, of the Act, describes authorizations specific to the Everglades and South Florida ecosystem restoration.     

Download the PDF (529kb)

Water Resources Development Act of 1996

Public Law 104-303, Oct 12, 1996
. . .Section 528, of the act, authorized the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to develop the Comprehensive Plan and requires that it be submitted to Congress by July 1, 1999. Also authorizes the Critical Projects Program at a maximum federal cost of $75 million.

http://www.evergladesplan.org/wrda2000/wrda_1996.cfm       

Download the PDF (542kb)

 

News

June 2004

17-June-04

Southern Golden Gate Estates Hydrologic Restoration Southern Golden Gate Estates Hydrologic Restoration Southern Golden Gate Estates Hydrologic Restoration Southern Golden Gate Estates Hydrologic Restoration Integrated Project Implementation Report (PIR)/ Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Draft - May 2004
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District, is moving forward formulating a plan for the Southern Golden Gate Estates (SGGE) Hydrologic Restoration Project. The Corps has prepared an integrated draft Project Implementation Report and Environmental Impact Statement, which is an in depth explanation of the SGGE project.

 

02-June-04

Aquifer plan would help Everglades
Editorial
© The News-Press (Ft. Myers)
Reversing any major part of the enormous environmental damage done to the Everglades in the past half century will take some dramatic technological gambles. That is why engineers need to press ahead with a 3 1/2-year pilot program for aquifer storage and recovery, a controversial technique untried on the massive scale envisioned in the Everglades restoration project. The $8 billion federal-state Everglades restoration tries to make everybody a winner by saving the water that the system produces naturally but which is now drained off to the sea to prevent flooding and keep certain historic wetlands available for farming. Farms, cities and the environment will all get what they need under Everglades restoration, despite enormous projected increases in human demand. Read more

April 2004

18 April 04

Water allocation concerns may delay conservation bill
By CATHY ZOLLO
© Naples Daily News
The Florida Department of Agriculture stalled and possibly killed an agreement late last week among developers, conservationists and state environmental regulators that would prevent Everglades restoration from being derailed. By Saturday afterrnoon, the parties involved were trying to reach another agreement, said state Sen. Paula Dockery, R-Lakeland, on whose water conservation bill the original deal was struck. Language to be added to that bill would have answered concerns by developers and had the OK of environmentalists about how the state would allot water from the $8.4 billion Everglades restoration effort. The agriculture department objected to the legislative language addressing water reservations. Agriculture Commissioner Charles Bronson wasn't available to comment, but other officials in his department said the agreement caught them off guard. They want more time to see how it affects farmers and their future water supply. "We believe there are many positive features in this bill that would involve reserving water for environmental needs which we very much support and are committed to," said Terence McElroy, spokesman for the department. "But it's important that the bill is a bit more broad-based." Read more

 

01 April 04

'Glades repair a high priority
Panel talks 'Glades repair St. Lucie River advocates hope the legislation discussed will fund the first restoration efforts.
By Jenn Stewart and Joel Eskovitz
©
Stuart News
WASHINGTON — In his first public comment on local Everglades restoration efforts, the federal government's top water manager on Wednesday called the $1.2 billion project a "high priority" this spring. Lt. Gen. Robert Flowers, chief of the Army Corps of Engineers, attended
the first day of congressional committee discussion of legislation that St. Lucie River advocates hope will fund the project.
"I look forward to it coming to my office," Flowers said during the first Senate committee hearing on the Water Resources and Development Act.
"It's a high priority."
Federal and state water management scientists — with help from Martin
and St. Lucie county activists — last week finished the final version of the project, which includes the construction of reservoirs, water cleansing areas and land preservation. Read more

$300M reservoir project part of Everglades restoration
The Berry Groves site, which is just east of the Lee County line and south of State Road 80, will be used to store water during the rainy season.
By CHAD GILLIS
© Naples Daily News
The state is taking a $300 million leap of faith to initiate an Everglades project that will create the largest water storage tank on the southwest coast of Florida. Project managers from the South Florida Water Management District and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers met in Fort Myers on Wednesday to discuss a reservoir system that will be built on more than 12,000
acres on the south side of the Caloosahatchee River.
"The district has decided to take some risks and pursue the Berry Groves site for a reservoir," said water management district project manager Agnes Ramsey. "But the project criteria has ranked very high (on the federal level.)" Funding for the reservoir portion of the project hasn't been approved by Congress yet, but district leaders decided to start the project early in order to get a jump on one of this region's largest Everglades restoration ventures. Read more

March 2004

31 March 04

Sugar stymies Glades plan
A plantation purchased by the state is needed for Everglades restoration, but the growers are ignoring a request to leave.
By CRAIG PITTMAN
©
St. Petersburg Times
Florida taxpayers spent $130-million five years ago to buy a 50,000-acre sugar plantation south of Lake Okeechobee as part of the ambitious plan to replumb the Everglades. Gov. Jeb Bush called the Talisman Sugar Plantation "the linchpin of Everglades restoration." The state didn't need the Palm Beach County land immediately, so it let sugar companies continue farming there. Now the state is preparing to take it over and recently notified the sugar companies to move out by April 2005. But the companies won't budge. They say the notices sent out by the South Florida Water Management District don't meet the strict contractual requirements for terminating the lease. "Accordingly, we do not recognize the notices as valid, and we will continue to plan our operations consistent with this position," Florida Crystals vice president Armando Tabernilla wrote in a terse, Feb. 11 letter. The other two companies that lease the land, U.S. Sugar and the Florida Sugar Cane Growers Cooperative, agree. Read more

Sugar grower refuses to leave leased land slated for Everglades restoration
By Neil Santaniello
©
Sun-Sentinel
Sugar grower Florida Crystals says it intends to ignore government notices telling the company to prepare to vacate thousands of acres of taxpayer-bought farmland that plays a central role in Everglades restoration. The company argues that the South Florida Water Management District failed to follow the legally prescribed procedure to warn growers about the start of work to flood 50,000 acres of district-owned farmland south of South Bay. The construction will create reservoirs that will benefit wetlands and wildlife. Environmental groups say the move suggests sugar growers intend to delay or seriously thwart the construction of water-storage areas integral to the success of the $8.4 billion Everglades restoration plan. The western Palm Beach County land at issue, best known as the Talisman Sugar property, "represents the heart and soul of Everglades restoration," said Charles Lee, senior vice president of Audubon of Florida. Lee called the sugar industry position "the initial declaration of war" from farmers over the property's fate. Read more

30-March-04

Area official stresses role of estuary life
By PAMELA SMITH HAYFORD, phayford@news-press.com
© Ft. Myers News-Press
KEY LARGO — Lee County Smart Growth Director Wayne Daltry on Monday urged managers involved in Everglades restoration to remember Southwest Florida estuary life, not just better-known species impacted by the project. When people typically think of Everglades creatures, they often have crocodiles and panthers in mind. But those are just a few of the many forms of plant and animal life affected by Everglades restoration, and Daltry doesn’t want plants and animals living in the Caloosahatchee River left out. “We want to make sure (the Multi-species Recovery Plan) includes estuary species,” Daltry told the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Working Group, which represents 29 agencies. The group met in Key Largo to talk about what issues are most important when it comes to the plants and
animals living in the restoration region.
The working group reports directly to a federal and state task force that was established in 1993 to coordinate environmental restoration in South Florida. Read more

 

25 March 04

Water District: Everglades restoration to stay on track
By JOEL ESKOVITZ
© Naples Daily News
WASHINGTON — As the legal battle involving water quality in the Everglades shifts from the U.S. Supreme Court to a federal court in Miami, the South Florida Water Management District said Wednesday the lack of a verdict means that Everglades restoration will remain
on track.
The Supreme Court, in an 8-1 ruling Tuesday, asked the lower court to obtain more information before determining whether water on either side of a Broward County pumping station should be considered one body. The Miccosukee Tribe, which initially filed suit against the district, contends the district needs a federal permit because it is pumping polluted water into a pristine section of the Everglades. Nicolas Gutierrez, chairman of the district's governing board, has contended that an outcome in favor of the tribe would force the
district to apply for permits at its 300 major water structures and 2,000 minor structures throughout its 16-county area.
Read more

Foley joins 'Glades restoration push
The senator [congressman] sent a letter to the Army Corps of Engineers chief in Washington asking that the plan be fast-tracked.
By Suzanne Wentley, staff writer
©
Stuart News
The local Everglades restoration plan hasn't reached the desks of members of Congress, but a lobbying push is already under way in Washington. Rep. Mark Foley [http://www.house.gov/foley/ ] has joined forces with a local river activist, two Martin County commissioners and the region's top Army Corps of Engineers official to bring attention to the $1.2 billion plan to clean and store water in Martin and St. Lucie counties. On Tuesday, Foley, a Republican who represents much of the Treasure Coast, sent a letter to the corps chief in Washington asking that the plan be fast-tracked through the bureaucratic process for quick congressional review. "It is not only of utmost importance to me but to the citizens of Martin County and the people of Florida to see this project finally executed," Foley wrote to Lt. Gen. Robert Flowers. Read more

December 2003

Judah, Pass: Construction would ease flood worries
By JEREMY COX
© Naples Daily News

Two local elected officials are urging federal regulators to approve the construction of several large gated communities near the Lee-Collier line despite protests from environmentalists who say the region is home to ecologically important wetlands. In separate letters to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Lee County Commissioner Ray Judah and Bonita Springs Mayor Paul Pass said the projects would help reduce south Lee's flooding problems and restore natural water flows. "This is an opportunity that must not be squandered," Judah wrote last month in a memo to Col. Robert Carpenter, head of the Army Corps' Jacksonville office. The developers' plans to deal with the massive amounts of flowing water represent "a prime example of a public/private partnership designed to solve a regional problem with little public expense," Judah said. Read more

Lake Istokpoga added to watershed project
By Pete Gawda
©  Okeechobee News
Lake Istokpoga was recently been added to the Lake Okeechobee Watershed Project. Discussion of the study of that lake was one of the topics at the Monday project development team meeting of all the teams involved in the Lake Okeechobee project. The meeting was held at the Dixon Hendry Campus of Indian River Community College. Anwar Khan of HDR, Inc. stated that good progress has been made on the Lake Istokpoga project and that the draft report is almost complete. In the future, he stated, both watersheds, Lake Istokpoga and Lake Okeechobee would be considered as one system. Tom James of South Florida Water Management District discussed phosphorous loading in the upper chain of lakes. He said information was gathered from various sources about phosphorous loading. The study revealed that most phosphorous loads came from tourist use, improved pastures and row
crops.
Read more

Water managers consider no-bid contract
By Robert P. King
©
Palm Beach Post
Water managers are set to OK a $1.5 million no-bid contract that could lead to an unprecedented alliance with an NFL team owner and Florida's largest citrus grower to build a reservoir aimed at helping the St. Lucie River. The result could be a 10- to 20-year partnership involving the South Florida Water Management District and Martin County landowners including Consolidated Citrus Limited Partnership, a company controlled by Texas businessmen who are strong supporters of President Bush. The initial $1.5 million contract would kick off a year of study on whether private interests could build, own and operate a reservoir and filter marshes cheaper than the district. If so, water managers would consider a long-term deal in January 2005, district Executive Director Henry Dean said
Friday. Read more

University of Florida holding 3rd Annual Restoration Update Forum
Highlighting the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP)

On December 18th and 19th the University of Florida, South Florida Water Management District, the US Army Corps of Engineers and the Florida Earth Foundation will offer the public its Restoration Update Forum, one of five modules in the Florida Earth Project Series.

Held at the newly built facilities of the Grassy Waters Preserve on North Lake Boulevard, West Palm Beach, Thursday’s sessions will bring participants up to date on the science of restoration and the basis for the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP).

On Friday, the course will go into the details of CERP, with sessions on what has been done in 2002 and what are the goals for 2003. Participants will study the South Florida region’s efforts in restoring a national treasure, the Florida Everglades.

A $100 registration fee covers textbook, materials, and lunches for both days.

Agenda and registration for the course is located on the Florida Earth Foundation’s (FEF) website, http://www.floridaearth.org/restoration.htm

For additional information, please contact Stan Bronson at the Palm Beach County Extension Service, 559 North Military Trail, West Palm Beach, Florida 33415.  The FEF phone number is (561) 233-1724, e-mail, stan@floridaearth.org.

 

September 2003

Public Comment to Everglades Consolidated Report (ECR) Peer Review Panel       
Arthur R. Marshall Foundation & Florida Environmental Institute, Inc.


NOTE:  This is also public comment on the Long-Range Plan for Achieving Water Quality Goals (Attention:  Gary Goforth) ABSTRACT ARM FEI Public Comment was provided to The ECR Peer Review Panel (PRP) during their open session Sept 24, 2003.   Areas addressed included: I.    Lack of Trees as BMP's in Conceptual Long-Term Plan for Water Quality and CERP Implementation. II.   RECOVER Monitoring & Assessment Plan (MAP) deficiency:  Lack of a Northern Everglades Watershed Conceptual Ecological Model (CEM) III.  Lack of focus on officially approved CERP Table 5-1 goals and objectives in approach to achieve a consistent evaluation methodology. Read more

April 2003       

The Final Conceptual Plan for Achieving Long-term Water Quality Goals - March 17, 2003 draft being considered by the South Florida Water Management District and proposed legislation (PCB NR 03-01 A) in the Florida House of Representatives may amend significant portions of the Everglades Forever Act and may lead to failure in meeting key provisions of the federal Settlement Agreement. 

 

2002 

 

October 25, 2002

Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan

Draft Agenda as of 18 October 2002

0900  Welcome to West Palm Beach
           Colonel May
           Jacksonville District Engineer

  0910  Welcome to the Environmental Advisory Board Meeting
           Lieutenant General Flowers
           Chief of Engineers

  0920  Swearing in Board Members
    Colonel May

Read more...

Copyright © 2002 Environmental Advisory Board All rights reserved.

 

October 1, 2002

Independent Scientific Review on the Everglades and South Florida Ecosystem Programs

Pertinent Legislation:

Section 601(j) of the Water Resources Development Act of 2000 (Public Law106-541) (http://www.evergladesplan.org/wrda2000/wrda.cfm) includes a provision requiring independent scientific review of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan's (CERP) progress toward achieving the natural system restoration goals.  Specifically subsection (j) this
legislation reads as follows:

   (j).  INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC REVIEW. -

   (1) IN GENERAL. - The Secretary [of the Army], the Secretary of the
       Interior, and the Governor, in consultation with the South Florida
       Ecosystem Restoration task Force, shall establish an independent
       scientific review panel convened by a body, such as the
       National Academy of Sciences, to review the Plan's progress toward
       achieving the natural system restoration goals on the Plan.
Read more...

Copyright © 2002 Environmental Advisory Board All rights reserved.

 

Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Performance Measures and Adaptive Management

Introduction

The scope, complexity, and significance of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) (http://www.evergladesplan.org) warrant the establishment of tools to measure, assess alternative plans, and report progress towards achieving the CERP objectives.  Performance measures have been developed by the REstoration COordination and VERification (RECOVER) (http://www.evergladesplan.org/pm/recover/recover.shtml) team to evaluate and assess the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP).  These performance measures will be used to measure and evaluate the success of CERP and to demonstrate compliance with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations, including the Water Resources Development Act of 2000, Florida Statute 373, the Principles and Guidelines, and federal regulations specifically guiding implementation of the CERP, including the programmatic regulations (http://www.evergladesplan.org/pm/progr_regs.shtml)
Read more...

2002 Environmental Advisory Board      


11-Jan-02

Editorial
HISTORIC AGREEMENT   
'GLADES RESTORATION GETS PRECEDENCE

The agreement signed Wednesday by President Bush and Gov. Jeb Bush that commits the federal government and Florida to joint funding of the $8 billion Everglades Restoration project plainly puts the parched River of Grass first on the list of water-use priorities. In stating this, the agreement goes beyond any water-allocation commitment made so far in either Congress's 2-year-old law that created the restoration plan or in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' recently released draft of rules to guide the massive replumbing job.
  Read more
Copyright  © 2002  Miami Herald  All rights reserved.
 

10-Jan-02




President George W. Bush hands over the pen to his brother Florida Governor Jeb Bush, left, after signing an agreement that ensures adequate water supplies are available to support the 30-year Everglades restoration plan
 

 

 

 

Bushes Ink Everglades Restoration Agreement
Pact Aims to Ensure Water for Ecosystem  

 




(Tim Chapman)

 

The two men with the most power over the $7.8 billion effort to restore the Florida Everglades -- President Bush and his brother, Gov. Jeb Bush -- signed a historic agreement yesterday to make sure water captured by the multi-decade effort actually goes to the Everglades.  In the agreement, Jeb Bush pledged the state of Florida to reserve enough water for the restoration of the parched Everglades ecosystem, regardless of the needs of farms or people. President Bush pledged that the federal government would respect Florida's control of its own water allocations. Both Bushes agreed to pursue adequate funding for the effort, which will be divided equally between the state and federal governments.  "We're really, really pleased," Jeb Bush said after the private Oval Office signing ceremony. "This is an important project. It will show that what was harmed by man can be restored by man."  Environmentalists and many federal officials had worried that the "Agreement of the Two Bushes" would give too much leeway to developer-friendly Florida, especially after the Army Corps of Engineers released draft rules for the Everglades project last month that just about everyone except Florida officials criticized as toothless and vague.  But some environmental groups and just about all relevant federal agencies yesterday praised the agreement's language as binding and enforceable, calling it a significant step forward.       Read more
Copyright  © 2002  Washington Post  All rights reserved.


09-Jan-02

White House Press Release
President Bush Takes Action to Help Restore Everglades

President Bush and Florida Governor Jeb Bush Wednesday took action to help the effort to restore the Everglades. The President and the Governor signed an agreement that ensures adequate water supplies are available to support the 30-year Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan.

      The White House
      For Immediate Release
      Office of the Press Secretary
      Wednesday, January 9, 2002

Statement by the President

On June 4, 2001, I joined the Governor of Florida in visiting the Everglades.  The Everglades and the entire south Florida ecosystem are a unique national treasure.  The restoration of this ecosystem is a priority for my Administration, as well as for Governor Bush.  Today we are very pleased to solidify our commitment and full partnership in this unprecedented endeavor by signing a joint agreement to ensure that adequate water supplies will be available to benefit State and federally owned natural resources.   Read more
White House Press Releases 


COMPREHENSIVE EVERGLADES RESTORATION PLAN

ASSURANCE OF PROJECT BENEFITS AGREEMENT

       WHEREAS, the Everglades ecological system is unique in the world and
one of the Nation's great treasures;  

       WHEREAS, the Central and Southern Florida Project as originally
authorized in 1948 has had unintended consequences on the Everglades and
South Florida Ecosystem;

       WHEREAS, the Water Resources Development Act of 1992 authorized a
Comprehensive Review Study (Restudy) of the Central and South Florida
Project;

       WHEREAS, as required by the Water Resources Development Act of 1996,
the Restudy was submitted to the Congress of the United States on July 1,
1999;

       WHEREAS, the Restudy, renamed the Comprehensive Everglades
Restoration Plan, was authorized by the Congress in the Water Resources
Development Act of 2000

Read more..

 

Bush brothers approve Everglades restoration plan
In a brotherly convergence at the White House, President Bush and Florida Gov. Jeb Bush signed an unprecedented state-federal agreement on Wednesday to devote water saved from restoration of the Everglades primarily to preserve the natural ecosystem.  The agreement triggers federal spending for a 30-year restoration project and declares that the highest priority will be given to environmental use of the water that flows through the 'Glades.  The signing ceremony in the Oval Office was designed to burnish the Bush brothers' environmental credentials while fending off worries that the $8 billion replumbing job - to be paid by the state and federal governments - would be exploited to serve farmers and urban developers at the expense of nature.  The Everglades agreement was the most substantive part of a series of events for the Bush brothers in the nation's capital. Jeb Bush took part in a ceremony touting an education reform bill just signed by the president. And the president was the star attraction at an evening fund-raiser for the governor.   Read more
Copyright  © 2002  Sun-Sentinel  All rights reserved.
 

More news


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Reports

June 17, 2004

Southern Golden Gate Estates Hydrologic Restoration Southern Golden Gate Estates Hydrologic Restoration Southern Golden Gate Estates Hydrologic Restoration Southern Golden Gate Estates Hydrologic Restoration Integrated Project Implementation Report (PIR)/ Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Draft - May 2004
http://www.evergladesplan.org/pm/projects/docs_30_sgge_pir.cfm

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District, is moving forward formulating a plan for the Southern Golden Gate Estates (SGGE) Hydrologic Restoration Project. The Corps has prepared an integrated draft Project Implementation Report and Environmental Impact Statement, which is an in depth explanation of the SGGE project.

 

Febuary 9 , 2004

Comprehensive Plan Interim Goals & Targets Report
is posted for Review and Comments

http://www.evergladesplan.org/pm/recover/igit_subteam.cfm

Cover Memo for Report (38 kb, PDF)

Interim Targets & Goals Report for Review (2 mb, PDF)

Excerpt from Report:

"The purpose of this document is to provide the public and agencies with an opportunity to review the technical recommendations of the Restoration Coordination and Verification team (RECOVER) for the indicators that will be used to establish the initial set of Interim Goals and Interim Targets. This document also describes the process that was used by the RECOVER subteam that developed these recommendations. Interim Goals and Interim Targets will be used to assess the progress of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (hereafter CERP or Plan) towards restoring the natural system and meeting other water-related objectives throughout implementation. The indicator documentation sheets (Section 1 for Interim Goals, Section 2 for Interim Targets) provide information for each of the Interim Goal and Interim Target indicators, including a discussion of the justification and relevance of each indicator to the CERP and an explanation of how each of the goals and targets will be predicted and assessed. The actual numeric targets or trends for the proposed indicators have not yet been calculated. They will be calculated after the current indicators are reviewed and after the requisite computer simulation modeling is completed."

 

  February 19, 2003

Settlement Agreement Report
The 1991 Settlement Agreement ended the Everglades lawsuit and was entered into by the federal government, the State of Florida and the South Florida Water Management District. The subsequent Consent Decree, as modified in 1995, specified that interim and long-term phosphorus concentration levels for the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) must be met by Feb. 1, 1999, and Dec. 31, 2006, respectively. The concentration levels vary monthly because they are calculated as a function of water stage measured at gaging stations 1-7, 1-8C and 1-9 within the Refuge. The stage range within which the interim and long-term concentration levels are applicable is 15.42 to 17.14 feet (mean sea level). Read more...


April 13-28, 2003

Florida Bay & Greater Everglades Restoration Science Conferences

Dear Colleague,

The Florida Bay and Adjacent Marine Systems Science Conference and the Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference will, for the first time ever, be held in conjunction to provide a joint forum for the exchange of information among physical, biological and social scientists. The structure and integrity of each event will remain independent as it has in the past, with independent meeting sessions, abstract books and scientific reports.

The Joint Conference on the Science and Restoration of the Greater Everglades and Florida Bay Ecosystem - "From Kissimmee to the Keys" will be conducted April 13-18, 2003 at the Westin Innisbrook in Palm Harbor, Florida, just 25 miles from Tampa.
Read more...

2002  Joint Conference on the Science and Restoration... 

         

Posted 16-Nov-01  new.gif (1016 bytes)

Basin-Specific Feasibility Studies to achieve the Long-term Water Quality
Goals for the Everglades

In order to meet the requirements  of the 1994 Everglades Forever Act and the federal Everglades Settlement Agreement, the District and other parties are currently working to achieve the long-term water quality and water quantity goals for the Everglades. The long-term goal of the Everglades Program restoration effort is to combine point source, basin-level and regional solutions in a system-wide approach to ensure that all waters
discharged into the Everglades Protection Area are in compliance with all state water quality standards by December 31, 2006. In order to achieve this goal, the District is implementing a strategy to ensure all water quality standards are met on a basin by basin basis. This strategy consists of conducting basin-specific feasibility studies which will integrate information from research, regulation, and planning studies to determine the
optimal combination of Best Management Practices, optimized Stormwater Treatment Areas, advanced treatment technologies, Water Preserve Areas, etc., to meet the final water quality objectives for the Everglades. 

This interactive WebBoard is being placed on our web site to make it possible for scientists and engineers from throughout the state, the nation, and the world to review and comment on reports and future deliverables.

Note:

   The latest draft is the October 30, 2001 draft subject to review and
   revision.

   SFWMD will also be posting documents describing alternatives for the
   Everglades Stormwater Program basins (non-ECP basins) today 11/8/01.

SFWMD.gov

http://www.sfwmd.gov/org/erd/bsfboard/bsfsboard.htm

 


Posted 01-June-01   

Florida Trend   - MARCH 2001 ISSUE
Fragile
How the $8-billion restoration deal will work — and how it could fall apart.

By Cynthia Barnett and Mike Vogel

 

No wonder the champagne corks were popping. An unlikely group of environmentalists, water managers, political appointees and industry representatives celebrated in January at an Everglades Coalition meeting on Hutchinson Island in southeast Florida. Just the month before, then-President Bill Clinton, with Gov. Jeb Bush in attendance, had signed into law a $7.8-billion program to save the Everglades — presumably ending years of fighting among environmental groups, the sugar industry and urban water users.    

  Read more 

Copyright  © 2001 Florida Trend  All rights reserved.

http://www.floridatrend.com/issue/default.asp?a=4303&s=1&d=3/1/2001

 

01-Feb-01

Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem  

Aquifer Storage and Recovery in the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan: A Critique of the Pilot Projects and Related Plans for ASR in the Lake Okeechobee and Western Hillsboro Areas.  A federal law enacted in December calls for a multi-billion dollar effort to restore the Florida Everglades' natural ecosystem. This report offers advice on restoration pilot projects that would involve storing excess surface water underground and pumping it back up for use during droughts.

Aquifer Storage and Recovery in the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan: A Critique of the Pilot Projects and Related Plans for ASR in the Lake Okeechobee and Western Hillsboro Areas

Copyright  © 2000 National Academies  All rights reserved.

 

  January-March 19, 2001

Settlement Agreement Report
The 1995 Consent Decree approved modifications to the 1991 Settlement Agreement to end the Everglades lawsuit entered into by the federal government, the State of Florida and the South Florida Water Management District. The Consent Decree specified that interim and long-term phosphorus concentration levels for the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) must be met by Feb. 1, 1999, and Dec. 31, 2006, respectively. The concentration levels vary monthly because they are calculated as a function of water stage measured at gaging stations 1-7, 1-8C and 1-9 within the Refuge. The stage range within which the interim and longterm level calculations are applicable is 15.42 to 17.14 feet (mean sea level). Total phosphorus concentrations are determined from water samples collected at 14 interior marsh stations (LOX 3 through LOX 16). Read more...

 

01-Nov--00

Missing Pieces in Ecosystem Restoration: The Case of the Florida Everglades   
Economic Systems Research, Vol 12, No. 3, 2000
RICHARD WEISSKOFF
(Received January 1999; revised November 1999)

ABSTRACT The largest ecosystem restoration in the world-a $7.8 billion rescue package-is now beginning in the Florida Everglades. This paper examines both the economic impact of the restoration itself and those pieces that are 'missing' from the official project analysis; namely, increased tourism, urban construction, in-migration, and changing agricultural patterns. These pieces comprise a variety of scenarios that are tested for a 45 year planning period with an augmented input-output model derived from a regional SAM. The new output and employment generated by the 'missing pieces', which are small relative to the vast economic base of the region, do represent a considerable  increase over the annual growth, especially by the year 2045. We conclude with a discussion of ways in which a growing regional economy might be reconciled with ecosystem restoration.



01-Sept-00

2001 EVERGLADES CONSOLIDATED REPORT
Draft ready for review
South Florida Water Management District

The Everglades Reports summarize available data and findings from research and monitoring of the Everglades Protection Area, and will be used by the South Florida Water Management District and Florida Department of Environmental Protection for making decisions affecting implementation of the Everglades Construction Project and related activities.

The Reports have been produced pursuant to the Everglades Forever Act (Section 373.4592(4)(d) Florida Statutes), which requires the District to submit a report to state officials after conducting a scientific peer review. Information from the Everglades Reports will be updated annually beginning in January 1, 2000 in peer-reviewed reports also required under the Act. These reports represent an important step in the process of reviewing technical information on the Everglades Protection Area and communicating progress on Everglades research and monitoring.
2000 SFWMD  

•  SFWMD Everglades Reports Home

•  Download from ftp server (pdf documents)

• 
View / Download the draft report on-line (pdf)

•  Peer Review of the 2001 Everglades Consolidated Report

•  Public Workshops AGENDA

•  WebBoard Conferencing

•  Previous Reports (pdf)


31-Jul-00

•  Coordinating Success    
Strategy for Restoration of the South Florida Ecosystem 
(PDF documents)

The purpose of this document is to describe the existing federal and nonfederal programs
designed to restore and sustain the imperiled South Florida ecosystem. Many federal,
state, tribal, and local entities are working to address the deteriorating ecological
conditions in South Florida. The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force (the
task force) coordinates and tracks the work. Congress directed the task force to produce
a restoration strategy.  

Published by:  SOUTH FLORIDA ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION TASK FORCE

•    Documents page

•    Click here for internal link to Executive Summary (html document)

 

06-00

An Overview of the Historical Everglades Ecosystem and Implications for Establishing Restoration Goals:
(39 pages, pdf format, 2.95 MB)

This report summarizes the processes that led to the formation of the Everglades over 5000 years. The information underlying this summary was obtained from a survey of historical reports, data from measurements of peat and sediment cores, and flow modeling using the South Florida Water Management District's Natural System Model. Available evidence shows that a natural phosphorus-enriched zone existed south of Lake Okeechobee that contained dense growths of pond apple and other upland species and an associated variety of birds and wildlife. This technical report was submitted to the South Florida Water Management District in June 2000
Tetra Tech, Inc. 

•    This technical report was prepared by Sujoy B. Roy and Steven A. Gherini, Tetra Tech, Inc., Lafayette, CA. The work described in this report was supported by the Sugar Cane Growers Cooperative of Florida.

•    Abstract (html)
•    Email questions to sujoy.roy@tetratech.com


11-Feb-00

• 
Rescuing an Endangered Ecosystem 
The Plan to Restore America's Everglades
Army Corps and SFWMD public relations site developed to inform and involve the public in the review of the current Central and Southern Florida Project.  


•  South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force
The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce operates under provisions of the Water Resources Development Act of 1996 - Section 528 excerpted here as it pertains to South Florida Ecosystem restoration.  Our home page reflects the structure and composition that was implemented under this Act. For information about the former Task Force, which operated under the Interagency Agreement, please see our Archive page. 

For more information about the Task Force or its Sub-Groups, please write or call:
Office of Public Affairs
South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force
c/o: Florida International University
University Park, OE 148
Miami FL 33199
Phone: 305/348-1665

•  South Florida Water Resource Projects
USACE presentation to restoration task force
September 29, 1999

•  Splendor in the Swamp
Remnants of a panoramic paradise have survived in the Everglades, even after a century of pumping, draining, channelizing, and levee-building.

•  South Florida Restoration   Science Forum
South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force with links to Mercury Problem, Agriculture, Wildlife, Hydrology, Historical Settings, Invasive Exotic Species, Landscape Synthesis and More. U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, Center for Coastal Geology
September  9, 1999

•  South Florida Restoration Electronic Library
Environmental Protection Agency

•  Good science fundamental to Everglades restoration
National Park Service, article by Bill Walker April 28, 1998

•  First stormwater treatment area begins discharging water into the Everglades
U.S. Waterways News Online, January 1998

•  What is Everglades Nutrient Removal Project?
Florida Plants, by Leigh Fulghum

•  The Everglades Nutrient Removal Project:  A Constructed Wetland Designed to Treat Agricultural Runoff/Drainage
University of Florida, W. Abtew, et al., abstract of article

•  The South Florida Everglades Restoration Project
University of Texas

•  EDF and Florida Agency Join in Everglades Restoration Effort
Environmental Defense Fund - Vol. XXVI, No. 3 --  news brief, May 1995


     General topic of restoration

•  Environment Science and Technology - "Moving Us  Toward a Sustainable Future
White House - Science and Technology - Shaping the twenty first
century - Chapter 4



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Water Conservation Areas

•  Concept 4:  Water Preserve Areas
The Governor's Commission for a Sustainable South Florida

•  West WCA-3A Hydropattern Restoration
South Florida Water Management District

 

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Sustainability

•  Governor's Commission for a Sustainable Florida
The Governor's Commission for a Sustainable South Florida was created by Executive Order 94-54 to make recommendations for achieving a healthy Everglades ecosystem that can coexist and be mutually supportive of a sustainable South Florida economy and quality communities. What follows is the Commission's Initial Report to the Governor and the Cabinet that presents its findings and recommendations pursuant to the tasks delineated in the executive order. The October 1, 1995 Initial Report was unanimously adopted at the Commission's September 1995 meeting. In addition, the 5 non-voting federal members of the Commission offered strong endorsement and support of the Initial Report.  November 1, 1995

•  Related material

 

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Restudy

•  Comprehensive Review Study
United States Army Corps of Engineers, Central & Southern Florida Project,

 


 

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Related documents

 

•  Water Development Act of 1996 
Section 528, Everglades and South Florida Ecosystem Restoration  (1996)


•  Everglades Forever Act
Fla. Stat. § 373.4592 (1994)
Legal codification of settlement in SWIM challenge   


•
  Marjory Stoneman Douglas Act  
Fla. Stat. § 373.4592 (1991)
The state of Florida's legal basis for its environmental plan   


•  Settlement Agreement
Settlement between federal and state parties in U.S. v. SFWMD, case no. USDC 88-1886-Hoeveler   (1991)

•  House Document 643
Establishment of Central and Southern Florida Project  (1948)

 

 

 

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Revised:  06/29/08

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